Title

Arthroscopic treatment of type II superior labral anterior to posterior (SLAP) lesions in a younger population: minimum 2-year outcomes are similar between SLAP repair and biceps tenodesis.

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

1-1-2021

Publication Title

Knee surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy : Official Journal of the ESSKA

Abstract

PURPOSE: Compared to a relatively older population over 30-40 years of age, the efficacy of biceps tenodesis for type II SLAP lesions in a younger population is not well studied. The purpose of this study was to compare outcomes between biceps tenodesis and labral repair for type II SLAP lesions in a young active population.

METHODS: Patients aged 15-40 who underwent primary arthroscopic biceps tenodesis or SLAP repair for type II SLAP tears between 2009 and 2016 were included. Shoulders with intraarticular chondral damage, full thickness rotator cuff tear, rotator cuff repair, labral repair outside of the superior labrum, bony subacromial decompression, and acromioclavicular joint resection were excluded. Patient-reported outcomes were evaluated using the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score, Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand Sports/Performing Arts Module (DASH-sport), visual analog scale (VAS) for pain, and satisfaction. Return to sport rates were also recorded.

RESULTS: Fifty-three patients (20 tenodesis, 33 repair) were available for minimum 2-year follow-up. Postoperatively, there were no significant differences in mean ASES, DASH-sport, VAS, and satisfaction between groups [ASES: tenodesis 86.3 vs. repair 86.4 (n.s.); DASH-sport: 11.0 vs. 22.5 (n.s.); VAS: 1.85 vs. 1.64 (n.s.); satisfaction: 8.50 vs. 8.00 (n.s.)]. Rate of return to pre-injury level of performance/competition in sport/physical activity was also similar between groups [tenodesis 63% vs. repair 50% (n.s.)].

CONCLUSIONS: In a young active population, primary arthroscopic biceps tenodesis is a viable surgical alternative to labral repair for type II SLAP lesions. The results of this study suggest that indications for arthroscopic tenodesis can safely be expanded to a younger patient group than has previously been demonstrated in the literature.

LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: III.

Volume

29

Issue

1

First Page

257

Last Page

265

DOI

10.1007/s00167-020-05971-0

ISSN

1433-7347

PubMed ID

32253479

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