Title

Quantifying the additional maternal morbidity in women with preeclampsia with severe features in whom immediate delivery is recommended.

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

5-1-2022

Publication Title

American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology MFM

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Preeclampsia with severe features when diagnosed at less than 34 weeks is associated with maternal morbidity and is managed by immediate delivery or inpatient expectant management.

OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to compare maternal morbidity in women with preeclampsia with severe features in whom the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommends immediate delivery versus those eligible for expectant management.

STUDY DESIGN: This was a retrospective cohort study of women with preeclampsia with severe features delivered between 23 to 34 weeks of gestation from 2013 to 2017 at a single tertiary center. Women were categorized into 2 groups: (1) those recommended by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists for immediate delivery, that is, ineligible for expectant management, and (2) those eligible for expectant management. The primary outcome was composite postpartum maternal morbidity, which included maternal intensive care unit admission, stroke, death, and other severe morbidities. The secondary outcomes included select adverse perinatal outcomes. Groups were compared and adjusted odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) calculated.

RESULTS: Of the 1172 women with preeclampsia identified during the study period, 543 with preeclampsia with severe features were included for analysis: 211 (39%) were ineligible for expectant management and 332 (61%) were eligible for expectant management. Baseline characteristics, including age, body mass index, race and ethnicity, parity, marital status, and gestational age at preeclampsia diagnosis, were similar between the 2 groups. Women ineligible for expectant management had significantly higher composite postpartum maternal morbidity (adjusted odds ratio, 5.02 [95% confidence interval, 1.35-18.69]). In addition, those ineligible for expectant management were more likely to have postpartum intensive care unit admission (adjusted odds ratio, 4.19 [95% confidence interval, 1.09-16.16]) and postpartum hemoglobin level of/dL (adjusted odds ratio, 5.07 [95% confidence interval, 1.35-19.08]). There was no demonstrable difference in neonatal outcomes between the 2 groups.

CONCLUSION: Women with preeclampsia with severe features who were ineligible for expectant management per the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists guidelines had a 5-fold increased risk of maternal morbidity, confirming the need for escalation of care and delivery without delay.

Volume

4

Issue

3

First Page

100565

Last Page

100565

DOI

10.1016/j.ajogmf.2022.100565

ISSN

2589-9333

PubMed ID

35033750

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