Title

Trends in Calcium Channel Blocker Use in Patients with Heart Failure with Reduced Ejection Fraction and Comorbid Atrial Fibrillation.

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

11-1-2021

Publication Title

The American journal of medicine

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Heart failure with reduced ejection fraction and atrial fibrillation commonly coexist. Most calcium channel blockers are not recommended in heart failure with reduced ejection fraction, but their use has been seldom evaluated. For patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction and comorbid atrial fibrillation, we sought to 1) determine the proportion discharged on contraindicated calcium channel blockers, 2) describe how clinicians' use of these medications at discharge have changed over time, and 3) identify predictors for contraindicated calcium channel blocker prescription at discharge.

METHODS: We analyzed 395 patients discharged with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction and atrial fibrillation between 2008 and 2018. Discharge on a contraindicated calcium channel blocker (any calcium channel blocker except amlodipine) was the primary outcome. Changes in calcium channel blocker prescription over time were evaluated with a Cochran-Armitage trend test. Multivariable logistic regression was used to identify predictors of calcium channel blocker prescription at discharge.

RESULTS: Twenty-nine (7.3%) patients were discharged on a contraindicated calcium channel blocker without change over time (P

CONCLUSION: One in 14 patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction and comorbid atrial fibrillation were discharged on a contraindicated calcium channel blocker, without change over time. Most patients were discharged on multiple atrioventricular nodal blockers, highlighting potential need for greater coordination between discharging physicians, pharmacists, and electrophysiology.

Volume

134

Issue

11

First Page

1413

Last Page

1418

DOI

10.1016/j.amjmed.2021.06.013

ISSN

1555-7162

PubMed ID

34245675

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