Title

The Impact of Hospital Teaching Status on Colonoscopy Perforation Risk: A National Inpatient Sample Study.

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

2-1-2020

Publication Title

Gastroenterology Research

Abstract

Background: Colonoscopy has been widely used as a diagnostic tool for many conditions, including inflammatory bowel disease and colorectal cancer. Colonoscopy complications include perforation, hemorrhage, abdominal pain, as well as anesthesia risk. Although rare, perforation is the most dangerous complication that occurs in the immediate post-colonoscopy period with an estimated risk of less than 0.1%. Studies on colonoscopy perforation risk between teaching hospitals and non-teaching hospitals are scarce.

Methods: The National Inpatient Sample database was queried for patients who underwent inpatient colonoscopy between January 2010 and December 2014 in teaching versus non-teaching facilities in order to study their perforation rates. Our study population included 257,006 patients. Univariate regression was performed, and the positive results were analyzed using a multivariate regression module.

Results: Teaching hospitals had a higher risk of perforation (odds ratio 1.23, confidence interval 1.07 - 1.42, P = 0.004). Perforation rates were higher in females, patients with inflammatory bowel disease and dilatation of strictures. Polypectomy did not yield any statistical difference between the study groups. Other factors such as African-American ethnicity appeared to have a lower risk.

Conclusion: Perforation rates are higher in teaching hospitals. More studies are needed to examine the difference and how to mitigate the risks.

Volume

13

Issue

1

First Page

19

Last Page

24

DOI

10.14740/gr1234

ISSN

1918-2805

PubMed ID

32095169

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