Title

Resuscitation Resident Impact in the Treatment of Sepsis.

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

7-18-2020

Publication Title

Cureus

Abstract

Background The resuscitation of septic patients is a fundamental skill of emergency medicine (EM) training. We developed a required rotation designed to augment resident training in resuscitating critically ill patients in the emergency department (ED). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the successful completion of sepsis core measures alongside clinical outcomes between patients with a resuscitation resident (RR) involved in care versus patients without. Methods This retrospective study was conducted at a single site tertiary care Level 1 trauma center with an ED census of 130,000 visits annually. Data were collected from January 1, 2015, to December 31, 2016, using the electronic medical record (EMR) via an Epic query (Epic Systems Corp., Verona, WI). Patients admitted with severe sepsis or septic shock (Surviving Sepsis Campaign guidelines) were included and separated into two groups, one with RR involvement and one without. Emergency department length of stay, time to initial lactic acid draw, lactic acid value, time to bolus fluid initiation, time to antibiotic initiation, need for medical intensive care unit (ICU) admission, and 30-day mortality were compared between the two groups. Chi-square tests and Fisher's exact tests were used to analyze the categorical variables. Two-sided t-tests and Wilcoxon rank-sum tests were used to examine continuous variables. Results Out of 4,746 patients admitted, 101 patients had an RR participate in their care. The median time to initial lactic acid draw was shorter (0.53 vs 1.05 hours; p < 0. 0001) and the lactic acid level was higher (2.5 vs 1.8 mmol/L; p < 0. 0001) with the presence of an RR. Resuscitation resident was correlated with a decrease in time to antibiotics and appropriate 30 cc/kg bolus, however, these were not statistically significant (p = 0.10 and p = 0.09 respectively). Resuscitation resident involvement was also associated with more medical ICU (45.5% vs 18.8%; p

Volume

12

Issue

7

First Page

9257

Last Page

9257

DOI

10.7759/cureus.9257

ISSN

2168-8184

PubMed ID

32821603

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