Title

Incidence and predictors of postoperative nausea and vomiting in children undergoing electrophysiology ablation procedures.

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

2-1-2020

Publication Title

Paediatric anaesthesia

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Postoperative nausea and vomiting remains a significant concern for patients undergoing general anesthesia for percutaneous radiofrequency catheter ablation and cryoablation for tachyarrhythmias.

AIM: Our objective was to examine the incidence and risk factors for nausea and vomiting in the recovery room.

METHODS: Children aged > 2 and ≤ 18 years who underwent general anesthesia for a percutaneous radiofrequency catheter ablation or cryoablation for a tachyarrhythmia between January 1, 2013, and January 1, 2016, were retrospectively reviewed. Outcomes included postoperative nausea, vomiting, and a composite of postoperative nausea and vomiting in the recovery room.

RESULTS: We identified 611 patients with a mean age of 13.3 ± 3.9 years, 54.5% male, and a mean length of anesthesia was 3.9 ± 1.0 hours. Vomiting or retching in the postanesthesia care unit occurred in 7.4% of patients and nausea in an additional 12.4%. A composite of nausea and vomiting occurred in 95 patients (15.5%). On multivariable analysis, a subhypnotic propofol infusion (OR 0.45, 95% CI 0.23-0.88, P = .019) and shorter anesthetic duration (OR 0.81 per 30 minutes, 95% CI 0.70-0.94, P = .006) were independently associated with less vomiting in the recovery room. A history of PONV (OR 2.24, 95% CI 1.24-4.05, P = .007) was independently associated with a composite of nausea and vomiting in the recovery room.

CONCLUSIONS: A shorter anesthetic time and a subhypnotic propofol infusion were predictive of a lower rate of postoperative vomiting in patients undergoing general anesthesia for electrophysiologic ablation procedures.

Volume

30

Issue

2

First Page

147

Last Page

152

DOI

10.1111/pan.13797

ISSN

1460-9592

PubMed ID

31869854

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