Title

Association between Serum Uric Acid and Exaggerated Blood Pressure Response to Exercise in Normotensive Men

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

5-2017

Abstract

Background: Exaggerated blood pressure (BP) response to maximal exercise is a predictor of cardiovascular disease, but the mechanisms for this hypertensive response are not fully understood. Increased serum uric acid levels have been associated with incident hypertension, but the relationship between serum uric acid levels and the exaggerated BP response to maximal exercise has not been established. The aim of this study was to examine the hypothesis that increasing levels of serum uric acid would be related to the exaggerated BP response to exercise, independently of confounding factors, in healthy normotensive men. Method: We evaluated 4,640 (mean age 49.1 ± 7.4 years, range 21~80 years) healthy normotensive men who underwent maximal exercise treadmill testing and fasting blood analysis. The exaggerated systolic BP response was defined as a systolic BP of 210 mm Hg or greater during maximal exercise. Results: The exaggerated systolic BP response was present in 152 men (3.3%). Serum uric acid was positively correlated with the maximal systolic BP response (r = 0.15, p < 0.001). Men in the highest quartile of serum uric acid (>6.6 mg/dl) had a 2.24 times [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.29–3.90] increased risk of prevalence of exaggerated systolic BP to maximal exercise than men in the lowest quartile of serum uric acid (<5.1 mg/dl) after adjusting for confounding variables. Each unit increment in serum uric acid levels was associated with a 16% increased risk of prevalence of exaggerated systolic BP to maximal exercise in the adjusted model (1.16, 95% CI 1.01–1.34). Conclusion: These results suggest that serum uric acid levels are associated with an exaggerated systolic BP response to maximal exercise, independently of established risk factors in normotensive men.

Comments

The Pulse of Asia, Taipei, Taiwan, May 5-6, 2-017.

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